Category Archive: Uncategorized

Jan 28

Teleconferencing in Real Life

I work for an international company so my daily work routine consists of numerous teleconference meetings. This video. sponsored by leadercast.com, shows just how comical the meeting would be if the problems faced in a typical conference call presented themselves in a face to face meeting. I hope you enjoy and maybe learn something from the video.

Share what you learn from this video about leading and managing meetings?

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Apr 12

Glioblastoma and Caregiver Internet Finds

Interesting articles related to glioblastoma and caregivers that I read this week.

Running for Jennie – Kristin Elmore

http://www2.mdanderson.org/cancerwise/2012/03/running-for-jennie.html

Kristin cared for her friend Jennie, who battled glioblastoma – a stage 4 brain tumor cancer. She was impressed by the courage and strength that Jennie displayed in her fight. I am encouraged to hear this theme on a frequent basis. I am strengthened to both witness and hear about such strength and courage. I am also grateful to hear of Jennie’s unselfish and fearless approach toward organ donation. I share a very similar story in my book Suddenly a Caregiver.

Understanding Glioblastoma, Part 1

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=466024256803333

Neuro-oncologist John de Groot, M.D., discusses the basics of glioblastoma, a malignant primary brain tumor, including risk factors, symptoms and diagnosis.

Understanding Glioblastoma, Part 2

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=466748153397610

MD Anderson neuro-oncologist John de Groot, M.D., explains treatment, clinical trials and research for glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor. He also offers advice.

Early Results of Activartis AV0113 Cancer Immunotherapy in Glioblastoma Trial Reveal Promising Trend

http://pipelinereview.com/index.php/2013041150680/Vaccines/Early-Results-of-Activartis-AV0113-Cancer-Immunotherapy-in-Glioblastoma-Trial-Reveal-Promising-Trend.html

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Feb 14

Support My Fight Against Brain Tumors

I am uniting with others to make a difference in the fight against brain tumors. I am passionate about this cause so I am taking action!

National Brain Tumor Society (NBTS) is a putting the search for a cure into overdrive. Progress is being made, but there is so much more to be done. Please support my efforts!

NBTS is fiercely committed to finding a cure for brain tumors. NBTS aggressively drives strategic research; advocates for public policies that meet the critical needs of the brain tumor community; and provides comprehensive patient, family, and caregiver resources.

Your support ensures this important work will continue.

Visit my page on the National Brain Tumor Society site to support this effort.

Read about my personal story at The Battle Against GBM.

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Sep 07

15 – The Law of Victory

"Leaders Find a Way for the Team to Win"

In John C. Maxwell’s book The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (2007), John shares the law of buy-in.

Most people prefer to win rather than lose. For any given leadership situation, a multitude of variables teeter the balance that influences whether a team wins or loses. Leaders that win often tend not to accept defeat as an option so they find ways to win rather than lose. The litmus test for a leader is found in a crisis — when the pressure is on. When under pressure, great leaders find a way for the team to win.

Great leaders understand that they are responsible for leading the team to victory. Great leaders shoulder the blame when things go wrong and do not seek out others to blame. Great leaders leverage their passion for the objective and their unwillingness to accept defeat to foster creative thinking among their team to identify solutions that allow the team to win.

Attaining victory hinges on three major components. First, a unity of vision among the team members is vital. The leader is responsible for creating the team’s mental model. Without the common mental model, team members form their personal agendas and contribute from that perspective. Despite the exceptional talent and potential of individual contributors, a team without a common mental model or vision rarely wins. I have said many times in the past that I prefer a team of above average performers with a common vision and good attitude to a team of star performers without a common vision and poor attitudes.

Second, the team members exhibit a diversity of skills. Some team members contribute vital skills while others contribute less vital skills but in most cases a variety of skills are necessary for teams to be successful. A key leadership skill is to staff the team with a diversity of skills. Another leadership skill is to appreciate and value every contribution whether from a vital or non-vital skill. At this point, I am compelled to add that thought diversity also adds to the team’s success. Most people are comfortable with like-minded people. However, a leader must develop comfortable relationships with others that think differently. The combination of ideas from a variety of perspectives normally leads to much better solutions when compared to those created by teams that missed key perspectives during development.

Third, the team needs a leader dedicated to victory and willing to mentor and guide team members to their full potential. Developing a vision and creating a unity among team members to work towards the vision does not happen by accident. The leader is responsible for molding the vision and communicating in such a way to create the unity or common mental model. The leader motivates, empowers, and provides the direction for the team to win.

As a leader, your responsibility for success must be a personal commitment to the task at hand. The leader needs to display unquestioned passion and dedication to the team’s success. If unable to meet those leadership goals, one must seek answers to ask some critical questions. Am I pursuing the correct vision? Am I in the wrong organization? Am I the right leader for this team or organization?

Ask your team about their purpose and mission. If the members do not agree on the purpose and mission, as a leader you need to define and communicate the vision to create unity. Discover the personal goals of your team members and strive to align those personal goals with the team’s vision, mission, and overriding goals.

I wish you well on your personal growth journey. I appreciate your additional insight, so feel free to comment to share your thoughts and experiences.

Links
Links to other posts in this discussion on the laws of leadership.
Mind map of the 21 laws of leadership.
Introduction to the leadership laws | 1 – The Law of the Lid | 2 – The Law of Influence | 3 – The Law of Process | 4 – The Law of Navigation | 5 – The Law of Addition | 6 – The Law of Solid Ground | 7 – The Law of Respect | 8 – The Law of Intuition | 9 – The Law of Magnetism | 10 – The Law of Connection | 11 – The Law of the Inner Circle | 12 – The Law of Empowerment | 13 – The Law of The Picture | 14 – The Law of Buy-in

Reference
Maxwell, John. (2007). The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership: Follow them and people will follow you. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/15-the-law-of-victory/

Aug 09

13 – The Law of the Picture

“People Do What People See”

In John C. Maxwell’s book The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (2007), John shares the law of the picture.

The law of the picture summarizes what is often observed in human nature. People tend to mimic the behaviors of their leaders. When a leader demonstrates behaviors that lead to success, people that follow mimic those behaviors and succeed as well.

The picture consists of vision, mission, and strategy. Great leaders possess a visionary mindset. The vision describes the “what” needs to be accomplished. Great leaders understand the purpose for reaching the vision or desired end state. The mission answers the “why” to reach an objective. Great leaders also posses the ability to develop a strategy to reach an objective. The strategy provides the “how” for achieving a desired end state.

Mission, vision, and strategy provide little benefit without action. So leaders recognize that without action the vision, mission, and strategy accomplish nothing. The leader is responsible for assisting people to take action toward the vision through the strategy. People rarely envision the end state the way that the leader does so the leader is responsible for communicating in such a way as to create a common mental model that makes the vision come alive. Communicating in such a fashion includes clear and creative techniques to continually reinforce the desired end state. When the leader lives the vision, the leader models the vision making it real and alive.

Nothing is easier than saying words. Nothing is harder than living them, day after day – Arthur Gordon

Good leaders recognize the importance of the example they set. A strategy rarely plays out exactly as expected. When deviations occur and uncertainty is high, the need for strong leadership increases. In this state, the ability to keep the vision alive that creates energy, passion, and motivation to press on in the face of uncertainty is the law of the picture.

Leadership Insights
1. People watch what you do. As a leader, recognize that people tend to model behaviors that you display. People tend to believe what they see not necessarily what they hear. You convince people by what you do not by what you say.
2. Teaching what is right is easier than doing what is right. On 6 Aug 2010, an example of this insight surfaced when Mark Hurd resigned as CEO of Hewlett-Packard. Mark stated, “As the investigation progressed, I realized there were instances in which I did not live up to the standards and principles of trust, respect and integrity that I have espoused at HP and which have guided me throughout my career. After a number of discussions with members of the board, I will move aside and the board will search for new leadership. This is a painful decision for me to make after five years at HP, but I believe it would be difficult for me to continue as an effective leader at HP and I believe this is the only decision the board and I could make at this time. I want to stress that this in no way reflects on the operating performance or financial integrity of HP” (Hewlett-Packard, 2010, para 5).
3. Change yourself before trying to improve others. As a leader, you need to lead yourself first. Set high standards of excellence for yourself. Work the hardest and longest on improving yourself. Failing to lead by example creates a fuzzy picture to those you intend to lead.
4. A leader’s example is the most value gift a leader can give. People desire leaders where espoused beliefs and actions align. People learn best from watching good leaders in action. Many leaders emerge by observing and replicating the behaviors of leaders that mentored them.

I wish you well on your personal growth journey. I appreciate your additional insight, so feel free to comment to share your thoughts and experiences.

Links
Links to other posts in this discussion on the laws of leadership.
Mind map of the 21 laws of leadership.
Introduction to the leadership laws | 1 – The Law of the Lid | 2 – The Law of Influence | 3 – The Law of Process | 4 – The Law of Navigation | 5 – The Law of Addition | 6 – The Law of Solid Ground | 7 – The Law of Respect | 8 – The Law of Intuition | 9 – The Law of Magnetism | 10 – The Law of Connection | 11 – The Law of the Inner Circle | 12 – The Law of Empowerment

Reference
Hewlett-Packard, HP. (2010, August 6). HP CEO Mark Hurd resigns; CFO Cathie Lesjak appointed interim CEO; HP announces preliminary results and raises full-year outlook . Retrieved from http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/press/2010/100806a.html
Maxwell, John. (2007). The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership: Follow them and people will follow you. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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