Monthly Archive: June 2010

Jun 30

Improve your Capacity with Effective Delegation

Busy ManIn the article, 8 – The Law of Intuition, I discussed the importance of delegation to improve your capacity to get things done, improve your leadership, and to grow the leadership ability of other people. This article provides additional detail about this critical leadership skill.

Delegation is a vital managerial tool that increases productivity and builds employees. Numerous authors provide several common techniques for accomplishing successful delegation. The techniques are easily traced to the four fundamentals of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Implicit in the techniques are keys skills that underlie the success. This article provides some insight on delegation and some tips to increase your delegation effectiveness.

The Chartered Management Institute (2000) states, “Delegation is about entrusting others with appropriate responsibility and authority for the operation and/or accomplishment of certain activities.” Many companies believe in the development of employees especially when an employee shows promise as a future leader. Many employers develop employees in several ways such as providing educational assistance, on-the-job training, and challenging job assignments. One method for providing challenging job assignments is to delegate managerial responsibilities.

Delegating managerial responsibilities provides two important benefits. First, delegation provides managers the opportunity to spread workload across multiple people. Sharing the workload affords the manager the option to accomplish more tasks, thereby, increasing the productivity of the department. The manager who demonstrates effective delegation exhibits true leadership. Second, delegation provides an opportunity to provide training for future leaders. When a manager effectively delegates workload, he or she teaches important leadership skills and, at the same time, instills a sense of confidence in those led.

Pollock (2003) provides seven secrets of successful delegation.
1. Delegate the right function
2. Plan the delegated job
3. Establish standard
4. Include feedback procedures
5. Pick the right person
6. Document the assignment
7. Give the assignment

These tasks include what Bateman and Snell (2004) argue are necessary for successful delegation: allocation of responsibility, authority, and accountability.

Most companies implement some form of a performance management system to document the tasks allocated to employees. During the planning cycle, the manager and employee document the task, the desired outcomes, and identify potential roadblocks. The authority delegated to the employee is often implicit in the desired outcome but rarely stated explicitly. The authority typically includes the ability to organize and use resources to accomplish the task. The best managers mentor the employees, when necessary, to ensure the employees’ success. Using the performance management system offers the opportunity to document accomplishments or provide corrections on a regular basis. The checkpoints provide a control mechanism that ensures managers communicate with employees.

Any system, when evaluated for effectiveness, has opportunities for improvement. A company’s performance management system is a tool and is only as effective as the manager and employee using it. Each manager and employee should seriously plan and document the delegated tasks. Many times the tasks are documented generically to avoid reworking effort when goals change, diminishing the overall effectiveness of the system. One of the secrets of delegation success is documenting the task (Pollock, 2003), so managers can increase delegation effectiveness by effectively using the performance management tool.

Communication and coaching are two skills that increase the effectiveness of the delegation process. The employee must understand the assigned task. The manager must possess the ability to communicate tasks unambiguously. Clearly defining the boundaries of a task, without defining the method, allows the employee some creative leeway to accomplish tasks. The coaching concept is readily visible in professional sports and is applicable in the workplace. The best managers coach their employees to peak performance. Coaches use the skills of the players and integrate those skills to accomplish the team goals. Likewise, good managers use the skills of employees and integrate those skills to accomplish organizational goals.

Delegation allows a manager the platform to build and manage an organization. Rather than trying to accomplish every task alone, successfully delegating work increases productivity and demonstrates leadership skills. Delegation allows a manager to coach employees and leverage other people’s skills to accomplish organizational goals.

What others are writing
Reasons why delegation is hard for some managers
Doing More with Less – Effective Delegation

I would love to read your comments. Please share your experiences!

References
Bateman, T.S., Snell, S.A., (2004). Management: The New Competitive Landscape (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill/Irwin,New York, NY
Chartered Management Institute. (2000). Successful Delegation. Retrieved 7/25/2005 from InfoTrac OneFile database.
Pollock, T. (2003). Secrets of Successful Delegation. Electric Light and Power. 81(5). Retrieved 7/25/2005 from InfoTrac OneFile Database.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/improve-your-capacity-with-effective-delegation/

Jun 27

9 – The Law of Magnetism

“Who You are Is Who You Attract”

In John C. Maxwell’s book The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (2007), John discusses the law of magnetism. What you want in people and what you get are not always a match. You attract people by what you are not what you want. John shares several key areas where the characteristics of the people you attract tend to mirror the characteristics of you or your organization: age, attitude, background, values, energy, giftedness, and leadership ability.

John provides the following tips for using the law of magnetism to your benefit.

1. I am unsatisfied with the caliber of those I attract – use the law of process to improve your leadership skills.

2. I am satisfied with the caliber of those I attract – Recruit people to staff your weaknesses. Any organization that desires to reach its full potential recruits people with a variety of skills and talents. Recruiting people unlike yourself requires a dedicated intention and focus because attracting people unlike yourself does not come naturally. Develop a compelling vision, communicate that vision, and earn the trust of those you need to attract.

The law of magnetism dictates that you become the kind of person that you want to attract. I wish you well on your personal growth journey.

Links
Links to other posts in this discussion on the laws of leadership.
Mind map of the 21 laws of leadership.
Introduction to the leadership laws | 1 – The Law of the Lid | 2 – The Law of Influence | 3 – The Law of Process | 4 – The Law of Navigation | 5 – The Law of Addition | 6 – The Law of Solid Ground | 7 – The Law of Respect | 8 – The Law of Intuition

Reference
Maxwell, John. (2007). The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership: Follow them and people will follow you. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/9-the-law-of-magnetism/

Jun 19

The iPad and eLearning

After my usual early wakeup and a stroll to the coffee shop, I performed my standard routine. With iPad in hand, I settled into a cozy spot on the couch and browsed through my email received throughout the sleeping hours, scoured through news feeds, and read a few blog posts.

Before leaving on our weekend get-away, I had located and downloaded some iTunesU podcasts with the anticipation of viewing on my own schedule. With some time to spare while I await my wife to awaken, I decided to watch a podcasts or two. I donned my Motorola S9 Bluetooth Headset and watched an introduction to iProgramming and a lecture from Stanford University about designing applications for the iPad.

I have truly enjoyed the mobility of the iPad for the last few weeks and will now add a new favorite application of the platform – eLearning. When browsing through iTuneU, you are sure to find topics that feed your craving for learning. As a dedicated lifelong learner, the on-demand, podcast delivery capability coupled with the mobility of the iPad provides another means of feeding the need for continual learning.

I look forward to hearing about your experiences as you explore and discover your favorite uses of the iPad.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/the-ipad-and-elearning/

Jun 18

8 – The Law of Intuition

In John C. Maxwell’s book The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (2007), John emphasizes the law of intuition. The law of intuition is one of the more difficult leadership laws for many people to grasp and understand. The law of intuition recognizes that leaders evaluate situations with their leadership bias. Intuition molds the leader’s thinking and decision-making processes. Everyone possesses intuition within their area of strength or body of knowledge meaning they instinctively know how to react to a given situation by relying on their strength and knowledge developed through practice. Likewise, leaders exhibit the ability to use intuition and instinct by leveraging their leadership bias. Intuition relies more on feeling and sensing rather than data or facts and figures. Intuition relies on facts but couples that input with other intangible factors such as timing, momentum, and morale. Those intangibles contribute to one’s success when leading others toward an objective.

What do you see in the world around you? What you see in the world or a given situation is a reflection of who and what you are. Your biases determine what you see. As one with a technology bias, I immediately try to solve problems from the technology perspective. As my responsibilities shift to more of a business focus, I must work hard to evaluate situations not only from the technology perspective but also from other perspectives then balance those with my technology bias. In other words, just because I can solve a problem with technology does not mean that a given situation warrants the effort from a business perspective.

Your natural ability and learned skills combine to form your intuition. Therefore, improving leadership intuition is possible for those willing to invest the time in learning new skills.

So what do leaders understand that non-leaders do not?

Leaders understand the situation. Leaders evaluate situations quickly from a variety of perspectives. This enables the leader to gather details often overlooked by others. For instance, listening skills enable the leader to sense the emotional state, attitudes, and chemistry of their team. They sense the momentum of their team and sense upcoming or potential roadblocks. These intangibles combine with the fact-based details to provide a more comprehensive view of the situation.

Leaders understand trends. We often find ourselves so focused on assignments that we neglect to step back to see the context or big picture. In the early 1990s, I remember reading an article predicting the exodus of manufacturing from the United States. At the time, I supported a large manufacturing facility. In just a few short years, I observed the reality of the prediction. The event forever emphasized the necessity of observing trends and the need to make the necessary adjustments to remain viable in the evolving economic environment.

Leaders understand their resources. Leaders consider the resources available to solve problems and reach objectives. My personal tendency or bias is to think how I can solve a particular problem. A leader tends to think in terms of leveraging available resources to solve problems. The ability to delegate effectively is a key trait of a successful leader. Effective delegation enables extending one’s capacity to accomplish more than can be done alone. Delegation is such an important topic, I plan to post an article dedicated to that topic.

Leaders understand people. The better one understands people, the more effective that leader is in mobilizing people toward a goal. Leadership requires the ability to persuade people to follow. The better you understand people and the more you develop relationships with people, the easier the persuading becomes.

Leaders understand themselves. Leaders assess their strengths, weaknesses, skills, blind spots, and state of mind regularly. Failing to do so creates the possibility of hindering rather that assisting progress. This occurs when your existing bias does not match the reality of the current situation. In the ever changing and rapidly changing environment in which we find ourselves, the need for frequent assessment is even more critical to the leader’s success.

Intuition is a combination of natural ability and learned skills. The less natural ability you have, the more important the learned skills become. Exercising those learned skills enables an intuitive or instinctive response when a particular situation or need arises.

Links
Links to other posts in this discussion on the laws of leadership.

Mind map of the 21 laws of leadership.

Introduction to the leadership laws | 1 – The Law of the Lid | 2 – The Law of Influence | 3 – The Law of Process | 4 – The Law of Navigation | 5 – The Law of Addition | 6 – The Law of Solid Ground | 7 – The Law of Respect

Reference
Maxwell, John. (2007). The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/8-the-law-of-intuition/

Jun 09

7 – The Law of Respect

In John C. Maxwell’s book The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You (2007), John shares the law of respect, which dictates that people tend to follow others with leadership skills and traits stronger than they themselves possess. Choosing those that one wishes to follow is not accidental. People follow others who possess leadership traits they respect and admire.

In certain situations, a person will follow someone else with weaker leadership traits such as a manager (chain of command) or due to someone’s past accomplishments. However, the law of respect suggests that people naturally follow those with stronger leadership skills. You notice this tendency when a new group forms. Often, the start of a new group is fraught with chaos as the group members sort out those with strong leadership. Once that occurs, the group starts following the one or few with the strongest leadership.

Earning respect comes from your natural ability, but natural ability alone limits leadership potential. Earning respect requires that you display respect for others. People will continue to follow when you respect others and lead consistently. Earning respect also requires courage. At some point in your leadership, you will stand alone. Good leaders do the right thing even when faced with failure and criticism. Displaying courage provides a hope for the future that others respect. Earning respect also comes from successes. People follow others with a good track record of successes. Loyalty contributes to your ability to earn respect. People respect that those help the team to the end and look out for those that follow even when personally damaging. Finally, people respect leaders that add value to those that follow.

Measure your level of the respect you earn. Take stock of those choosing to follow you because they determine your level of leadership and respect. If those that choose to follow are committed and display strong traits then your leadership level is probably high. Without earning respect, you will have difficulty leading. While serving in the military, I remember a senior non-commissioned officer (NCO) that struggled with his  leadership. He never earned the respect of the group. Rather, the members of the group  choose to follow two lower ranking NCOs whom they respected. Subsequently, the lower ranking NCOs each led a team while the senior NCO was relegated to a position without assigned personnel.

When you are frustrated because people follow you reluctantly or you do not attract the caliber of people you wish to, you need to evaluate your leadership. The law of respect dictates that people willingly follow those with stronger leadership than they themselves possess.

Links
Links to other posts in this discussion on the laws of leadership.
Mind map of the 21 laws of leadership.
Introduction to the leadership laws
1 – The Law of the Lid
2 – The Law of Influence
3 – The Law of Process
4 – The Law of Navigation
5 – The Law of Addition
6 – The Law of Solid Ground

Reference
Maxwell, John. (2007). The 21 irrefutable laws of leadership. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

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Permanent link to this article: http://darrylpendergrass.com/Blog/7-the-law-of-respect/

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